Scottsdale Arizona


Free Income Tax Preparation Sites by quotes

Free Income Tax Preparation

Free Tax Preparation Sites

Phoenix Arizona — Community Information & Referral’s Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) Tax Assistance Hotline is available through April 15th This special Hotline, in cooperation with the IRS, provides information on locations where low and moderate income individuals and families can go to have their tax forms prepared free of charge. Volunteers at the sites are trained by the IRS and at certain locations, can file your taxes electronically, also free of charge. Call (602) 263-8856 or 1-(800) 352-3792 outside Maricopa County or visit our website at http://www.cir.org/ for details. 2008 EITC/Tax Assistance Hotline sponsors are Arizona Public Service (APS), Salt River Project (SRP), and Southwest Gas Corporation.

Last year (January 1, 2008 through April 15, 2008) 14,318 callers were assisted by the EITC Hotline.

Community Information & Referral (CIR), a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, provides FREE 24-hour Help Hotline services to ten Arizona counties, including the greater Phoenix area. Trained Information & Referral Specialists respond to calls for help, assess problems, and provide appropriate information and/or referrals to available community resources. Callers can reach the helpline in Maricopa County by calling (602) 263-8856 or, outside of Maricopa County toll free at 1-800-352-3792. Visit us on the web at: http://www.cir.org

Free Income Tax Preparation
Free Tax Preparation Sites

Phoenix Arizona — Community Information & Referral’s Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) Tax Assistance Hotline is available through April 15th This special Hotline, in cooperation with the IRS, provides information on locations where low and moderate income individuals and families can go to have their tax forms prepared free of charge. Volunteers at the sites are trained by the IRS and at certain locations, can file your taxes electronically, also free of charge. Call (602) 263-8856 or 1-(800) 352-3792 outside Maricopa County or visit our website at http://www.cir.org/ for details. 2008 EITC/Tax Assistance Hotline sponsors are Arizona Public Service (APS), Salt River Project (SRP), and Southwest Gas Corporation.

Free Income Tax Preparation

Free tax help at VITA sites in Mesa Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) The City of Mesa’s Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program provides free basic tax preparation and free electronic filing… Read more »

Last year (January 1, 2008 through April 15, 2008) 14,318 callers were assisted by the EITC Hotline.

Community Information & Referral (CIR), a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, provides FREE 24-hour Help Hotline services to ten Arizona counties, including the greater Phoenix area. Trained Information & Referral Specialists respond to calls for help, assess problems, and provide appropriate information and/or referrals to available community resources. Callers can reach the helpline in Maricopa County by calling (602) 263-8856 or, outside of Maricopa County toll free at 1-800-352-3792. Visit us on the web at: http://www.cir.org/

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Loop 101 Freeway lane closures continue by azhttp

— Loop 101 Freeway lane closures continue, starting Friday at 10 p.m.— Scottsdale election cycle shifts to fall; candidate packets available— October is domestic violence month— Public is invited to comment on Alarm Systems Ordinance update— McDowell Sonoran Preserve trailhead earns top design award— Preserve stewardship orientation course takes place Saturday



Greater Phoenix resale numbers end summer on sour note by azhttp

MESA, Ariz. — With 4,240 recorded sales in August 2007, the local resale housing market continues its uninspiring march. The activity of August followed July 2007 at 4,330 sales and was below last year’s 5,685 transactions. The month of August brought the year-to-date total to 37,750 sales, which is well below the 47,515 for 2006 year to date and 78,935 sales for 2005 year to date.

“Primarily the role of August is to act as a transition from the heady days of summer to the lower recorded sales of the last months of the year,” said Jay Butler, director of Realty Studies in the Morrison School of Management and Agribusiness at the Polytechnic campus.

“However, there are increasing risks that the market could move lower than expected, driven by geopolitical risks and tighter mortgage underwriting guidelines. Both of these factors could make it increasingly difficult for people wanting to buy, but are not able to obtain needed financing. This point will be especially true in the move-up market,” Butler added.

The combination of large inventories and low interest rates have enabled people to purchase more expensive homes, which is one reason the county median price has remained fairly stable. But, recent troubles in the nonconforming mortgage market (mortgages above $417,000) have begun to adversely impact the move-up market. Last year, 39 percent of the resale homes sold for more than $300,000, while it was 37 percent for August 2007.

Foreclosures and new homes are providing a competitive alternative to the resale home in many areas of the market. New home builders continue to aggressively pursue buyers through incentives such as specially priced upgrades, free pools and gift cards. Thus, the 2007 resale housing market is showing signs of increasing weaknesses that could drive it below the current expectations of it being a good year.

Much like the ever-increasing sales activity of the last few years, the rapid improvement in price has disappeared. The median home price in August was $255,000 in comparison to $265,000 for July and last year’s $262,500. The most evident impact of lower prices is improved affordability. Although mortgage interest rates increased slightly from last year’s 6.1 percent to 6.2 percent, the lower median price allowed the monthly payment to decrease slightly from last year’s $1,350 to $1,330.

Changes in median prices can vary tremendously throughout the valley. For the western suburbs the median price has fallen from $240,000 in August 2006 to $217,450. On the other hand, homes in the North Mesa area have gone from last year’s $235,000 to $255,000. While some areas have declining prices, other areas are increasing or remaining fairly stable, especially the mature neighborhoods that are close to freeways, retail and schools. Since the greater Phoenix area is so large, the median price can range significantly from $680,000 ($697,500 in July) in North Scottsdale to $189,000 ($185,000 in July) in the Maryvale area of the city of Phoenix.

Although townhouse/condominium units have retained some popularity with seasonal visitors, investors and people seeking affordable housing, this housing sector has continually fallen from the 1,350 sales in March to 955 sales, while there were 1,100 sales for a year ago. Even with slower sales, the median home price increased slightly from $181,000 in July to $182,500 in August ($170,000 for August 2006).

The median square footage for a single-family home recorded sold in August 2007 was 1,740 square feet, which is larger than the 1,640 square feet for a year ago. The larger size further demonstrates the role of the move-up sector in the local housing market. In the townhouse/condominium sector, the median square footage was 1,115 square feet which is larger than the 1,090 square feet reported a year ago.

·       In contrast to August 2006, recorded sales in the city of Phoenix decreased from 1,760 sales to 1,160 sales, while the median sales price decreased to $220,000 from $224,000 for a year ago. Since Phoenix is a geographically large city, the median prices can range significantly such as $189,000 in the Maryvale area to $314,750 ($330,000 in July) in the Union Hills area. The townhouse/condominium sector decreased from 395 to 300 sales, while the median price increased from $153,295 to $173,000.

·       While the Scottsdale resale home market declined from 390 from a year ago to 360 recorded sales, the median sales price decreased from last year’s $598,500 to $559,375. The median resale home price is $680,000 ($697,500 in July) in North Scottsdale and $305,000 ($315,000 in July) in South Scottsdale. The townhouse/condominium sector in Scottsdale increased slightly from 205 to 210 sales, while the median sales price decreased from $266,000 to $242,900.

·       Compared to August 2006, the Mesa resale housing market declined from 645 to 460 sales, while the median price fell from $240,000 to $237,000 ($242,000 in July). The townhouse/condominium sector also fell from 165 to 120 sales, while the median home price decreased from $159,950 to $152,000.

                   

·       Glendale decreased from 445 to 300 sales and the median sales price decreased from $255,000 to $240,750 ($238,500 in July). The townhouse/condominium sector decreased from 65 to 45 sales, while the median sales price decreased from $143,000 to $140,500.

       
·       For the city of Peoria, the resale market declined from 280 to 205 sales, while the median price dropped  from $270,000 to $257,500 ($264,950 in July). The townhouse/condominium sector decreased from 25 to 20 sales and the median price went from $165,000 to $162,500.

·       In comparison to a year ago, the Sun City resale market remained at 90 sales, while the median sales price decreased to $175,000 from $200,000. Resale activity in Sun City West declined from at 50 to 45 sales, the median sales price decreased from $240,650 to $220,000. The townhouse/condominium market in Sun City declined from 50 to 45 recorded sales, while the median home price decreased from $139,000 to $124,000. In Sun City West, activity fell from 15 to 10 sales and the median sales price decreased from $175,750 to $130,000.

·       The resale market in Gilbert decreased from 355 to 290 sales and the median sales price decreased from $320,000 to $300,000 ($314,500 in July). The townhouse/condominium market remained at 10 sales as the median sales price decreased from $210,000 to $180,000.

  • For the city of Chandler, the resale market fell from 410 to 300 recorded sales, while the median sales price went from $308,000 to $282,800 ($308,375 in July). The townhouse/condominium market stayed at 40 sales and the median sales price declined from $182,000 to $163,250.

·       The resale market in Tempe decreased from 155 to 115 sales, with the median sales price decreasing from $299,950 to $270,000 ($283,810 in July). The townhouse/condominium sector was stable at 70 sales, but the median sales price increased from $179,250 to $194,950.

·       The highest median sales price was in Paradise Valley at $1,950,000 with a median square foot house of 4,220 square feet.

·       In the West Valley, the following communities represent 10 percent of the resale market.

  •  
    •  
        o       Avondale fell from 130 to 95 sales with the median price moving from $254,325 to $223,275 ($222,500 in July).
        o       El Mirage decreased from 80 to 60 sales, while the median home price went from $212,750 to $185,000 ($180,000 in July).

        o       Goodyear went from 95 to 80 sales, while the median price decreased from $280,000 to $272,000 ($248,750 in July).

        o       Surprise decreased from 225 sales to 200 sales, with the median price decreasing from $250,000 to $232,500 ($234,900 in July).

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Realty studies

Realty Studies is associated with the Morrison School of Management and Agribusiness at Arizona State University’s Polytechnic campus. Realty Studies collects and analyzes data concerning real estate in the greater Phoenix metropolitan area. Realty Studies is a comprehensive and objective source of real estate information for private, public and governmental agencies.  Its director, Dr. Jay Q. Butler, may be reached at (480) 727-1300 or e-mail him at Jay.Butler@asu.edu. To subscribe to RSS feed for Realty Studies news, visit http://www.poly.asu.edu/realty/rss.html.

ASU’s Polytechnic campus, located in southeast Mesa, offers bachelor and graduate degree programs, unparalleled by other Arizona state universities, through the Morrison School of Management and Agribusiness, the School of Applied Arts and Sciences, the School of Educational Innovation and Teacher Preparation, and the College of Technology and Innovation. Visit us online at http://www.east.asu.edu.



How to Attract, Hire and Retain Baby Boomers by quotes

(and why you should want to)

 

Tuesday, September 11, 7:30-9am 

Jobing.com

(map)

 

– or-

 

Thursday, September 13, 7:30-9am

Scottsdale Community College Business Institute

(map)

 

Calling all human resource professionals, hiring managers and business owners!

Looking for great employees?  The secret to your talent acquisition challenges may be in hiring and retaining baby boomers – a generation that is 78 million strong.  Because the cohort of 44 million Gen Xers isn’t nearly a large enough to fill all the positions baby boomers now hold, companies must get creative with their hiring strategies or face dire staffing consequences.  This workshop will explore many myths about boomer workers and why leading-edge boomers make excellent, low maintenance employees.  Find out what boomers really want (and it isn’t always money!), how to attract them to your company and how to get them to stay on the job past traditional retirement age. 

 

The workshop will be facilitated by:

Fred Ricker, Corporate Outreach Consultant, Scottsdale Boomerz, with over 21 years senior management experience working with major organizations such as IBM, CSC Consulting, W.W. Grainger, Inc., Johnson & Johnson, 3M, Abbott Labs, along with health care providers such as UCLA, Stanford University Medical designing, and implementation of “human capital investment” programs focused on attracting, hiring, training, and development of company human resources.  He is a strong advocate for the value of hiring “boomers” in organizations seeking an evolving recruitment avenue/strategy.

Chris Payne, Human Resource Specialist, Scottsdale Boomerz, with extensive experience within private and non-profit organizations to enhance their corporate cultures and improve their business.  He is the Principal of Dance With The Wind Consulting, but prior to that, Chris held executive positions in Human Resources at Telecommunications, Biotechnology, and Defense firms in the Southwest, serving as a change agent in times of unprecedented growth.  His technical experience includes organizational foundation-building, team start-up, management coaching, performance management systems, mediation, and leadership skills training. 

Cindy Cooke, Executive Director, Scottsdale Boomerz

 

Locations: 

  • Jobing.com, 4747 N 22nd St. #100, Phoenix (September 11)

  • Scottsdale Community College, Business Institute, 14350 N. 87th Street, Scottsdale (September 13th)

 

Fee:  Free

 

To register, click here.

For more information on any of these programs,

call 480 423-6188 or

e-mail boomerz.info@sccmail.maricopa.edu  



Scottsdale Job Network Meeting by quotes

Please plan to visit Scottsdale Job Network at our next meeting on TUES, SEPT 4, 2007

There are no meeting fees or membership dues.
Guest speaker:
Robert Meade,
Recruiting Manager
DBL Distributing LLC
(480) 422-7763

Learn about this actively growing Scottsdale company, its history, products and services, growth plans, and staffing needs. Rob will discuss strategies to learn the skills hiring managers are seeking and how to communicate those skills effectively during an interview.

Meetings are held on the first and third TUESDAY mornings, from 9:00-11:30 AM. We are a community group that meets at and uses space provided free of charge by:

Temple Chai
4645 East Marilyn Road
Phoenix, Arizona 85032

Temple Chai is centrally located just east of the Piestawa Freeway (Route 51) and south of the loop 101. Marilyn Road is just west of Tatum Blvd. between Thunderbird and Greenway Roads.

Meetings are open to the public.
We appreciate donations to cover our operating costs.

SJN is a non-profit community group of business leaders and volunteers. We are not a job placement forum, and we do not match candidates to openings nor do we send resumes to employers or recruiters. There is no guarantee of employment either directly through this group or as a result of association with SJN.

We do, however, provide education in the job search process and all attendees have the opportunity to meet and work with people who offer support and guidance during employment transition. Many resources for finding Jobs in Phoenix are available through this website and via participation in the SJN mailing list, the Phoenix Jobs Job Board and by interacting with members and volunteers at meetings and afterwards.

Visit SJN Here.

Phoenix Jobs

New resources for Greater Phoenix Area Job Seekers.

The non-profit community support group formerly known as “Scottsdale Job Network” is expanding to cover much more of the valley of the Sun and is re-branding to SJN.

Phoenix Jobs resources have been added to the SJN Blog.

Some of the featured resources include Jobing.com, the Scottsdale Job Network Phoenix Jobs Job Board and the City of Phoenix Jobs listings at Phoenix.gov.

Please stop by and take a look. We think you will find some of these SJN resources valuable in your job search.



Scottsdale Job Network (SJN) by quotes

How to Sell Your Value as a Job Seeker.

Meeting Notice for July 17, 2007 meeting.

Scottsdale Job Network (SJN) is a group of job seekers and others volunteering their time to help them in their career transitions.

The group attracts speakers from industry, technology, government, finance, coaching and recruiting to discuss job search fundamentals including developing a marketing plan, writing a resume, networking and interviewing.

The value of the SJN lies in the skills, business networks and personal passions of our members. Membership is open to everyone willing to share their skills and anyone interested in local networking or in need of employment transition support. Attendance is required at one meeting to become a member.

Meetings are held on the first and third Tuesdays, 9:00 AM – 11:30 AM at Temple Chai, 4645 E. Marilyn Road, Phoenix, AZ 85032.

NEXT MEETING: TUESDAY, JULY 17

Guest speaker: Jack Lindsley, Sandler Sales Institute, How to Sell Your Value as a Job Seeker”

All people, including prospective employers, make judgments about us early in the conversation. Learn how to communicate with a prospective employer in a way that will have them doing a “sales job” on you instead of you on them.

________________________

Scottsdale Job Network (SJN) is a non-profit community group of business leaders and volunteers. We are not a job placement forum, and we do not match candidates to openings nor do we send resumes to employers or recruiters. There is no guarantee of employment either directly through this group or as a result of association with SJN. We do, however, provide education in the job search process and all attendees have the opportunity to meet and work with people who offer support and guidance during employment transition.  

CONTACT US:

E-mail: info@scottsdalejobnet.com
Voice-mail: (480) 513-1491

Thank you,


 

Bill Austin, Scottsdale Job Network Board Member
AZhttp, Inc.



CELEBRATE INDEPENDENCE DAY – JULY 3 – “BEACH PARTY” AND LUNCH by quotes

JOIN US TO CELEBRATE INDEPENDENCE DAY!

JULY 3 – “BEACH PARTY” AND LUNCH . . .

 

For Independence Day, many people head for the hills or the beach planning picnics, fireworks and fun.  For those of us staying in town for the 4th of July holiday, Scottsdale Job Network offers the opportunity for fun networking!

Scottsdale Job Network is planning a Beach Party (without the ocean) at the Tuesday, July 3 meeting, 9:00 A.M.-12:30 P.M.

 

Members are encouraged to leave business attire at home.  Arrive early (9 AM) for networking and socializing–come dressed in casual clothes.  Shorts, sun dresses, floral shirts, patriotic colors, plus sun glasses and straw hats are the preferred dress code!

 

Stay after the business meeting for a deli lunch (no charge and donations accepted) and more networking-socializing!
 
Meeting presentation:

Eric Walton, Chief Operating Officer
Camisa Technologies and SJN Board Member

Post Interview Strategies:  What Next?

This meeting will provide you with practical tools and techniques to follow up after all types of interviews. You’ll learn how to write quality thank you notes, and ways to communicate them. During the session we will practice follow-up discussions and other techniques designed to keep the employer interested, how to stand out among all the other interviewees, and how to get the job.

For more information:

 

Web:                http://www.scottsdalejobnet.com/

E-mail:              info@scottsdalejobnet.com

Voice mail:        (480) 513-1491

 

About Scottsdale Job Network

The Scottsdale Job Network is a non-ecumenical group of community-minded business, government, education and non-profit professionals who volunteer their skills, experience and time to support the job and career transitions of others.  Membership is open to people who are unemployed or under-employed, and those who are willing to network, share their skills and help others. 

VisionScottsdale Job Network (SJN) is the premier career transition support group in the Valley.  

Mission: Scottsdale Job Network (SJN) provides low or no cost basic training, personal connections, access to resources and moral support for job seekers through a Valley-wide network of passionate volunteers.    

http://www.azhttp.com/